Forge welding stainless to 1075

Jfk742

New Member
I was thinking about trying to weld some stainless to steel. The stainless would be the tool edge, AEB-L, the 1075 or maybe even mild steel would be the body. I’m thinking quenching may prove an issue. The cladding steel doesn’t need to get hard.

My design aim is to get some carbon diffusion between the stainless and cladding steel. If I understand the concept correctly, I was thinking a lower carbon content steel would give the most effect when etched.

Thoughts on the concept or experience achieving a good weld and having it survive quench? I will be plate quenching as I want to harden the AEB-L.
 
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Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
I've never done it. But I'm not afraid to give my expert opinion :p

From the little I know, it is key to keep oxygen away completely. I've see people tigweld every line in a stack where 2 pieces of steel touch each other. I think carbon content isn't as important as other alloys. Stainless damascus has carbon in both components.

I prefer to have cladding hardenable because mild steel tends to contract and I've seen san mai literally tear itself apart after heat treatment. It's also common to see cracks in the spine of knives that don't tear themselves apart.
 

Victor Creazzi

King of Bondo
I talked to a guy who did some knives with stainless cladding. He said weld all the way around the billet and avoid hitting perpendicular to the stack. Oh, and make sure that your surfaces are clean clean.
 

Jfk742

New Member
I was thinking mild would be less likely to to try and break the weld upon quench. I have a couple of billets I plan on welding tomorrow. One will be aeb-l clad in 1075 and the other with mild. I’m still waiting on the new oven but figure I may as well get some projects together for when I does show up.
 

Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
Mild is definitely more likely to do this. Because mild (and wrought) don't harden, they want to contract back to the original length, while the core has hardened. The closer everything is to each other in terms of thermal behaviour, the higher the chances of success, and the less warp.
 

Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
True. Tbh, If I were doing this, I'd use stainless for all 3 layers, and choose the middle one in an alloy that would etch dark.
 
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