Shop Tips and Tricks

Gasman

Show me that again!
Im an "Extra Class" Ham Radio Operator. I use an entire bedroom for my radio equipment. Ive managed to set aside one wall for razor stuff but the rest os trancievers, amps and all the goodies needed for comunications.

BTW, here is a pic of my house. The one with the big tree in the yard. You can see half of my antennas if you look close enough. Ha.

My call sign is K1ING.
20160725_165447.jpg


But enough of that. Its not really what this thread is about.
 
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geezer

Member
Always enjoyed tools and modifications thereof. From Dremel to pin router is the ongoing saga. Been a long slog, start, phart, stumble and recover. Exacerbated by plumbing fitting and sketchy shop time over the months, I finally got it operating and , with a bit of cutter choice for each material, it will be a goody. A variable height, selected diameter pin on top is for guiding against a precut pattern, and no deeper. The variable height cutter comes from underside of the table.
pin r.JPG


And then, (after a couple weeks of bodging, I met the Daisy Pin Router, the only way to go for sanity and retaining hair!
daisy pin router.

Here is the guiding video of how it works:

I shall have both because I have a couple further mods to accomplish special projects. The little Dremel one can be used at a table top near by.

JMO, YMMVW
~Richard

PS. I have never met two old Sheffield blades that are exactly the same shape and grind. Making scales that are close and oversize for most and finishing each to the blade could work. Again, YMMV
 

geezer

Member
PANCAKE DIES
And, now for the fledgling inlay and bolster maker...I won't get to it for a long time. I used them for some flat work Jewelry series.
They use a power press. I made a small 20 ton hydraulic press for my use. About any arbor press may do the job.
20ton.JPG



~Richard
 
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verndahl

AKA tintin
I found a fairly easy way to make some little brass domed washers with some stock washers from Micro-fasteners.
IMG_1216.JPG
I drilled a 1/16 inch hole in a block of lead and then with a punch i made from a bolt i had on hand did the same thing and rounded the end. I insert a piece of brass rod and use the punch to make dimple in the lead. The brass rod acts as a guide to center the washer.
IMG_1213.JPG

IMG_1212.JPG

IMG_1214.JPG

and the stamped washer

IMG_1215.JPG

it is necessary to file the bottom to round it off and polish the whole washer. This is something i do with all my washers from micro fastener to help them look more like the old donut shaped washers that were original to old razors. I do this by using a piece of brass rod peened over on one end and a short piece from a pen ink tube. this whole thing is held in a drill and can be smoothed and polished easily.
IMG_1220.JPG

I don't have a picture right now of the finished product but i'll see if i can get one.
 

geezer

Member
A nice solution! Much simpler than my fitted punch and die to make a few washers. Your method is the way they were done long ago. Shape of the punch gave the style. They used relatively thin material, and that could be the reason spacer collars were needed.
Again, Thank you!
~Richard
 

verndahl

AKA tintin
IMG_1225.JPG
Thank you. I should add that i do use a spacer under it to give it some backing. Here's another one for you all. In order to keep from losing small parts (or dropping delicate things like razors) which always seem to fall on the floor when i drop them, I've attached sort of a short bib to the edge of my work bench with snaps. This one i made with a piece from a pair of worn out jeans. Just slip the bib on while working (especially if you can't slide your chair all the way under your work bench) and any (or most ) things you drop will fall on the bib, not the floor.
 
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Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
Base on something I saw here, I put my pins in a drill chuck today when peening the first end.
Just put them in with a bit less than 1/16 sticking out, and then just whack it with the peen.
Works perfectly efficient and the pins remain straight
 

32t

Member
View attachment 595 Thank you. I should add that i do use a spacer under it to give it some backing. Here's another one for you all. In order to keep from losing small parts (or dropping delicate things like razors) which always seem to fall on the floor when i drop them, I've attached sort of a short bib to the edge of my work bench with snaps. This one i made with a piece from a pair of worn out jeans. Just slip the bib on while working (especially if you can't slide your chair all the way under your work bench) and any (or most ) things you drop will fall on the bib, not the floor.
Working with precious metals an apron like this is also a good idea.

I have many lead bricks 12.5 lbs. Shipping would suck but maybe Charlies?

lead.jpg
 

MotoMike

New Member
[QUOTE="Gasman, post:
But enough of that. Its not really what this thread is about.[/QUOTE]
OK, also and Extra, KB9VWH (Victory With Honor) 73
 

Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
In case someone was wondering: stainless damasteel will take an amazing etch with ferric chloride.
Some people use sulfuric acid or strong hydrochloric acid.
I have neither, and the stainless seems to ignore my nitric acid.
But the ferric chloride really makes it pop. It needs a longer soak than carbon steel, but other than that easy peasy.
 

geezer

Member
If, your Dremel goes TU/ bad:
Drill swap.JPG

Any similar tool with threaded end/finger stop above the chuck/ collet will work as a replacement for about 1/2 the cost. Here the pillar drill/drill press was new and the Dremel was not! The black parts shown are the internally threaded thing i am writing about.

~Richard
PS the removable box on the base is to raise the height of the base for my poor eyesight.

PPS. The old drill press is on the previous page...I do miss it!
 
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Bruno

Administrator
Staff member
That looks like a very nice press. I don't think anyone would ever need anything bigger if they only work on razors. Probably has less wobble than your average big drill press too.
 

geezer

Member
My old one ~1940 was much smaller but would not accept any modern Dremel or other similar tools. It worked for 10 years so I was very lucky. When that Dremel went bad, I had to get another drill press.

PS. A photo of it is on the previous page
 
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geezer

Member
Small space crumbcatcher..........

One way to do it: for a steel bench...
Leather welding apron and tarp tie downs About $12 on special A strong magnet of some type ( assure that the bare magnet can actually meet bare/ painted bench metal Those magnets in/on the hole of the tarp hold downs

This is a solution for metal benches. I can move it around to a bit of angle and still open the built in drawers of the bench. With the "V" block i can saw, file,and sand,without getting much on the floor. file, sand,without getting much dust/ crumbs on the floor

Just a possibility suggested by "verndahl." Thanks!

~Richard
PS, A good way to not cut yourself with dropped sharps, Xactos, picks, Blades and keep more stuff off the floor!
PPS. Yes, that is my s
Metal bench crumb catcher..parts laid out
Apron laid out.JPG

In place
Apron in situ.JPG
 
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